Ride reports from members, mostly of club runs but all stories welcome.

April 2021

Burton ride to Attenborough

Eight riders departed from Burton, on Sunday and made their way out to Eggington via the A38 cycle path from Stretton. One rider left our group at Willington; then it was lanes out to Swarkstone. From there, it was Weston and Aston, on Trent to Sawley Marina. We took the track along the side of The River Trent from Sawley, to Attenborough Nature Reserve.
After lunch outside in the sun, we traced our way back a similar route as far as Swarkstone and then changed direction to travel through Milton and Repton, and on to Burton; but first, we paused our journey and had a welcome refreshment stop between Swarkstone and Repton!

Andy Leach

April 2021

Tuesday Evening ride to Trent Lock

A pleasant Tuesday Evening ride led by Mark. 20 miles out to Trent Lock with a bit of everything, all of it flat. Nice to see the pubs open and the gardens full, though we resisted the temptation. A lovely evening to be out on the bike and so glad to see these rides back on the program after missing last year completely.

Paul Hilditch

August 2021

Burton Short Sunday ride to Albert Village

The Burton morning ride visited the new Lake District on Sunday… Albert Village! The outward ride passed through Caldwell, Botany Bay, Linton and Linton Heath where we passed the famous “pink house”. We were tickled pink.
At Swains Park we left the road for the tarmac trails around the original lake At Albert Village. We paused at the ornate ironwork information board which depicted some of the former industries of the area. The lakes have been created out of former opencast sites, first for clay and then coal. Here we learned we were to climb the locally named “hill of doom”. This was the rise from the lake to the main road where we viewed the works going on for the second lake on the other side. Plenty of birdlife on the lake

Ian Hill

Sept 2021

Derby Sunday ride to Hough Mill

Inspired by news from the Tuesday Wayfarer group that Hough Mill now has sails I thought we’d have a Sunday outing there. We covered lots of trails enroute including the Cloud Trail, Garendon Trail, Grace Dieu Trail, Mill Lane bridleway and Jaguar Woods trail. I did also contemplate using the Tramway Trail (Calke Abbey)….. but in the end stuck with the road for a bit. We arrived at Hough Mill, Swannington to find the volunteers setting up for their ‘Take Teddy to the Mill’ afternoon event. This was fortuitous as it meant that the mill had been opened early and we could have a peak inside. After climbing the steps to the top of the mill and admiring the new sails we headed off for refreshments at Staunton Harold and then home to Derby. 40 miles, minimal traffic, heritage, sunshine and good company.
already and also a large area of tree plantings (my photo is from a couple of months ago, so it’s changed already}. Paths are being created which should link to the Boothorpe bridleway and into Blackfordby.
We followed the trail through Conkers and regained road to head for a leisurely coffee break at The Trough Cafe at Grangewood Garden Centre. Word is getting around about this new cafe, it was the busiest we have seen it. We returned through Botany Bay and Rosliston back into town.

Sue Rogers

September 2021

Tuesday Wayfarers Picnic at West Leake

Ten riders met at the Waterside Cafe on a hot sunny September morning. After coffee we made our way through Elvaston Castle to Borrowash, Draycott, Church Wilne and Sawley to Long Lane taking the cycle route along the A 453 past the power station and then turning right up West Leake road to our lunch destination in the churchyard behind the church with pleasant views over the fields to the south.
A long lunch was enjoyed with plenty of good conversation before remounting for the return journey. It was getting unseasonably hot by now so a steady amble to Sutton Bonnington, Kegworth crossing the M1 to Lockington, Hemington, Cavendish Bridge, Shardlow, Ambaston and Elvaston and home.
Around 30 miles Cafe to Cafe on probably one of the last days this year when I will be wearing shorts.
The photos show our picnic site and the local library in the bus shelter in West Leake village.

Dave Walker

September 2021

Derby Thursday ride to Abbots Bromley

Thursday Ride numbers do tend to fluctuate, but today was the best-attended for some time – there were 14 riders at some point on the journey. Faces old – some we hadn’t seen since pre-pandemic-, new (welcome Sean and John) and familiar congregated outside Costa on Kingsway.
We set off in search of Cobwebs Café in Abbots Bromley via the cycle track into Mickleover before taking Radbourne Lane to Sutton-on-the-Hill and Hatton.
Upon arrival at the Nescafé factory, we paused to view the sculpture park only to bump momentarily into Malcolm.
At the Five-Way junction, we pressed on, taking the Newborough Road. We had intended to arrive in Abbots Bromley via the southerly Hoars Cross route, but instead took a group decision to take the northerly route via Bromley Wood instead, just to show the Garmin who was boss.
Cobwebs Café was a new lunchtime venue for many, including us. On the plus side, the root veg soup, the cake (both in terms of quality and choice) and ambience (helped by the autumn sunshine) were first-rate. On the down side, the café, despite clearly intending to provide for cyclists, had an incomprehensible No Sandwich or Panini rule; plus the soup’s roll was on the meagre side. Cyclists cannot survive on soup and a bit of cake alone, no matter how delicious. Only 6 out of 10 therefore.
Ignoring the protesting beeps from the Garmin, we took the opposite route out of Abbots Bromley, much the preferable route overall, and headed for Anslow, Hilton and the Greenway. We finished with 11 riders, quite an achievement.
We ourselves clocked up 106km and 920 metres climb, a bit longer than the usual Thursday ride but, given the warm and sunny conditions, didn’t mind a bit.

Graham Johnson

August 2021

Derbyshire End to End Challenge ride

Bravo to the Derbyshire End to Enders and Holme Moss Heroes.!
Distance from the southernmost road in Derbyshire at the River Mease Bridge between Clifton Campville and Lullington, and the northernmost road at Holme Moss summit was 80 miles with 7313 feet of climbing (but only 5866 feet of descent… oops). An epic challenge and all 15 starters completed the ride.
It showcased the variety of scenery in our lovely County, from the southern pastoral undulations of the Trent Valley, through the limestone scenery of the High Peak, then the gritstone moors of the North-west. The one day group set off in sunshine and finished in the clouds that enveloped Holme Moss. What a contrast. The two day group had slightly better conditions up there and could see the transmitter mast but, mind you, they had the view of the road ahead climbing up the hill.
The route can be seen at HERE
Holmfirth did not have any suitable accommodation for the large group which meant a further 11 miles and 525 feet of ascent to reach Storthes Hall, to the south of Huddersfield. Riders were ready for some food by this stage!
Riders returned by various means on the Sunday with some catching trains at various places and a group riding back to Derby and Burton by way of the Yorkshire moorland west of Denby Dale, Strines Moor, Ladybower and Calver.

Ian Hill

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September 2021

CTCDAB Annual trip to the seaside

Planning for this year’s Skeggy ride was hampered by the lack of accommodation at a reasonable cost, Skegness has never been so popular, but it wasn’t feasible for several riders.
So, ten riders in this year’s event, eight heading for the seaside and two doing part of the route as a day ride (Though one was nearly in Skeggy before turning for home – no prizes for guessing who) We set off from the Arena pretty much at the planned time of 8am (Except Darron who’d arranged to meet in Nottingham). We headed out over the new bridge to give those who hadn’t done so before a real treat. We were back on the usual route by Borrowash, then onto the A6005 all the way through to Beeston, where we turned for the canal. We got caught up with the Park Run along the canal path, no point trying to overtake, and not much of a delay before they turn off. Into Nottingham and the customary stop and photo op on the suspension bride.
There was some hedge trimming going on before Radcliffe, with the inevitable consequence, it could have been anyone, but we’re grateful to Glen for taking the hit for the group. We were only a few miles from the café, so it made sense for most to go ahead. The Kingfisher Lodge at Portland Fishing lakes offers al you could ask for a breakfast stop, it’s just a little far for a day ride, or I’d go more often.
Refreshed, we set off for the next café stop. This section is the most rural, though the crossing of the A17 was particularly busy, thankfully it’s a straight dash across. The cliff up to Boothby Graffoe hasn’t got any easier, but at least it’s fairly short and there’s not much traffic. Then some more lanes and across Timberland Fen in the sunshine. Woodhall Spa was busy, the cafes either full or slow, we spread ourselves around, some opting for a takeaway. Despite making good progress, there were some time restraints due to travel and accommodation requirements, so we didn’t want to hang around.
And the final push, ten miles of undulating lanes, ten miles of fast quiet B road through Spilsby, and a few miles of lanes to the seaside. We’d made decent time, the weather had been on our side, the 10% chance of rain passed us by and we enjoyed a steady tailwind.
Skegness was absolutely packed, no wonder we struggled to find any accommodation, it was like the height of the season. We still managed to find somewhere for the traditional post ride Fish & Chips, before parting for our various travel and accommodation.

Paul Hilditch

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